Juice Cleanses

Should you do a juice cleanse?

Doing a juice cleanse is healthy and beneficial
Doing a juice cleanse has no benefits and is not worth it
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Started by
Molly Banta
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The Issue

Juice cleanses are the new fad diet. However, they are not only popular among the usual quick-fix weight-loss crowd, but also among health gurus and foodies. A cleanse can last anywhere from a few days to a few weeks, where the dieter will exclusively ‘eat’ these juices (bought from a provider or homemade), water, and sometimes chicken broth. While cleanses are hailed for their low-calorie, high-nutrient nature and supposed detoxifying effect, critics claim that many of these health benefits are nonexistent, merely temporary or the result of the placebo effect.

Most Divisive Question

1 stories vs 1 stories

Remaining Questions

5 questions total

Final Thoughts

What people think
Pro: Cleanse
Depends
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    Jordan Grossman
    Founder of Niaterra News

    This has been an interesting Nia, not just for what was found, but equally as importantly what wasn't found.

    The experts seem to consistently say that juice cleanses and fasts are a waste of time, not as nutritious as just having fruit, and don't help with healthy or real weight loss. There certainty has not been a coherent definition of "toxins", nor what would lead someone to believe they need to be cleansed from our "system".

    While the experts are almost certainly correct, it is interesting that we couldn't find actual research to confirm it. It's most likely because it's a newer fad and so there just hasn't been enough time to complete and publish a proper study, but it still is worth highlighting that nothing beats good evidence, and that's lacking on both sides.

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    Lauren Lankford

    Research on the matter of juice cleansing is pretty consistent, stressing that while it is effective in nutrient gain, other important dietary factors like protein and carbohydrates are swept under the rug. There is also the issue of maintaining desired weight loss- since juice cleanse leads to a loss of water weight, the weight comes back as soon as your diet incorporates more solids again. In this way, juice cleansing reminds me of the Atkins craze.

    However, everyone's body is different. One cannot make sweeping claims on what diet best cooperates with metabolism because everyone's metabolism is different. I believe juice cleanses can be quite effective if balanced with lean solid meals, like a chicken breast with steamed veggies, for example. For me personally, I would need this balance in order to carry out focused work days and continue my work out routine. However, if I ever wanted to drop a few pounds for a summer getaway in one fell swoop, I would consider a juice cleanse.

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    Anoushka Parthasarathi

    In my opinion, juice cleanses can be either healthy or unhealthy--depending on how we do them. There are ways of incorporating juice cleanses into our daily diet: drinking juices in between meals, drinking a bit more juice than we eat food, etc. But the point remains that we still get the nutrients we need from food and don't miss out on what eating real food gives us, especially fiber.

    There are arguments in favor of doing a juice cleanse, though, because, according to WebMD, we need a detox diet of fruits and vegetables every now and then to clear our bodies of all the unhealthy foods we put in it. We don't realize that we tend to stuff our bodies of fats, oils, and bad carbs as opposed to the healthy foods we should be eating more often. In order for us to clean out our bodies in a sense, sources say a diet of fruits and vegetables is best for that.

    I say that as long as we don't skip out on the nutrients that we get from whole fruits and vegetables and incorporate a juice cleanse into a diet filled with fruits and vegetables, then there's nothing wrong with doing it.

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Anti: Cleanse
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    Greg Zimmerman

    After reading the various supporting articles, I believe that through traditional dieting and exercise one can accomplish more healthily what they wish to obtain from a juice cleanse. The one positive things that juice cleanses may do is remove the temptation of traditional food from one diet.

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    Qiao Xue

    It has been proved clearly that there is no extra benefit to do a juice cleanse.
    Although juice comes from fruits, it loses the fiber which is beneficial for people's digestive system. Also, it seems that the juice cleanses is effective to get rid of unwanted toxins. However, our body has the ability to get rid of the unwanted toxins naturally. Further, there are solid evidences to show that it is not possible to get enough macronutrients, vitamins, and minerals only through consuming juice.
    Therefore, compared with consuming juice, it is better to eat more whole fruits.

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    Satchie Snellings

    Though I was initially interested in juice cleanses, this Nia has changed my opinion. I was first struck by the loss of fiber which occurs during the blending process. I would not want to sacrifice my fiber intake in the name of eliminating toxins, especially because, as the support story above explains, the human body is capable of filtering out toxins naturally. My main issue with juice cleanses is the lack of any science proclaiming it possible to get all essential nutrients, vitamins and minerals through a juice cleanse. Though there are certainly benefits in terms of increased fruit intake and the loss of water weight. I believe that any diet or cleanse that withholds essential vitamins, minerals and nutrients from the body is certainly not worth it.

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    Aya Abitbul

    To me, the research clearly favors eating whole fruits and veggies. Regarding digestive health alone, there's no question that juicing quite literally rips fiber right out of the diet, despite its proven necessity for a healthy intestine. As shown in the nia, unless one makes a lifelong swear to abandon chewing, which is unnatural, unrealistic, and inconvenient, the weight lost while juicing reappears quickly upon one's return to a regular, well-balanced diet.

    As stated in the nia, doctors insist that certain organs, such as livers, kidneys, and pancreases, are natural detox mechanisms, so the alleged necessity to detox with a juicing diet is redundant. If there were enough harmful toxins in someone's body to the level that they even noticed their existence, their problem wouldn't be that they're eating too many whole foods, it would be that they probably have liver or kidney failure. Ultimately, the benefits of juicing do not seem all that unheard of, unique, or necessary for our health.

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  • 0 1p n0plk8qfioy0kp4zcqbq5xigify 3mscnvb9kqnfceu2aspczcxzkikmc7ft3msczzbrxhfdgdzql07qecbvhsfd dzegs7qvpqflq64fimp39orry 3qdtcp8z0u12gsuqitjuv
    Molly Banta
    Nia Creator

    Doing a juice cleanse does not seem to be worth it.

    My parents took part in a juice cleanse last winter to "restart" and "detox" their bodies. They wanted their bodies to be healthy.

    However, I don't see how juice cleanses truly promote health any more than upping your daily intake of fruits and vegetables. The Nia shows that the juice itself is no more beneficial than whole produce, and the body can suffer metabolic repercussions (not to mention the enormous binge you probably go on after drinking only juice for a week...).

    If I wanted to get healthy enough that I was willing to go through the immense inconvenience of going on a juice cleanse, I would just force myself to eat significantly more fruits and vegetables every day instead.

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